Traffic

3 August 2013.

To our knowledge, Collier-Hughes applications for Permits 1353 and 1354, at the end of 24th Avenue SE, Naples does not yet have a traffic impact study.  We have been told that, at sometime subsequent to citizen public comments before the Collier County Board of County Commissioners on June 25 or Joe Mulé and Don Loritz’ appearance on Naples Newsmakers on July 17, Collier County did initiate a traffic impact study.

The problems are the following:

A typical, modest Sunniland Trend oil well produces about 200 bbl of crude per day.  This is about 80,000 pounds.  A typical, maximum-sized crude tanker truck is an 18-wheeler with a loaded weight of 80,000 pounds.  Thus if the well at 24th Ave. SE is a typical Sunniland Trend well, it will produce one maximum-sized tanker truck of crude per day.  If modern, enhanced oil recovery techniques enable the well to double typical Sunniland production, it will produce two tanker trucks per day.

According to a 1994 GAO study citing the National Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, the road wear caused one 80,000 pound 18-wheeler is equivalent to that caused by 9,600 passenger cars.

It is 8 miles from 24th Ave. SE to Oil Well Road along DeSoto Blvd.  DeSoto Blvd. is currently a country road with no shoulder, no sidewalks, and only 3/4″ of asphalt.  The road is manifestly  inadequate for 9,600 passenger cars per day, let alone 19,200 (if well production doubles).  A typical Collier County road costs between $2 million and $4 million per mile.  Therefore the cost of bringing DeSoto Blvd. up to code for oil production will approach $20 million.  By code, this cost “Roads that used to have five vehicles a week now have a hundred trucks rolling on them in a day, or an hour. So it’s a pretty significant change,” he says. The trucks DeWitt County, (like the one heard in the audio version of this story rolling down a rutted road) are going to and from drilling rigs. In the past several years, energy companies have been drilling thousands of new oil and gas wells here and elsewhere in Texas. The drilling operations use truckloads of water, sand and chemicals. According to TxDOT, drilling the average well now requires over a thousand truck trips.should not be borne by county or state taxpayers; the should be born by the developer (Collier-Hughes).

Preserve Our Paradise, Inc. and/or other public interest organizations should be prepared to sue Collier County if these provisions of the County Land Development Code are not enforced.

 


TxDOT Plans to Convert Some Roads to Gravel   — Texas officials requested an additional $1.6 billion to address road damage from energy sector development. During the regular legislative session that ended in May, lawmakers found the agency $200 million a year for its overall roadwork and a one-time $500 million infusion for energy development-related issues.

Roads Killed: Texas Adds Up Damages from Oil Drilling  — “Roads that used to have five vehicles a week now have a hundred trucks rolling on them in a day, or an hour. So it’s a pretty significant change,” he says. The trucks DeWitt County, (like the one heard in the audio version of this story rolling down a rutted road) are going to and from drilling rigs. In the past several years, energy companies have been drilling thousands of new oil and gas wells here and elsewhere in Texas. The drilling operations use truckloads of water, sand and chemicals. According to TxDOT, drilling the average well now requires over a thousand truck trips.

 

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